Radiation from Damaged Japanese Reactor Reaches US West Coast

According to the statement, the levels were “approximately one-millionth of the dose rate that a person normally receives from rocks, bricks, the sun and other natural background sources."

The announcement is the first time the EPA has said any amount of Japanese radiation has been detected in America. Earlier in the day, the agency issued a statement which said no radiation had reached the country from Japan. “As of noon (EDT) EPA’s RadNet radiation air monitors across the U.S. show typical fluctuations in background radiation levels,” the statement said.

The first detection of radiation from Japan has been recorded along the West Coast of the United States, but the UN insists the levels of radiation are far below dangerous levels.

The UN's Comprehensive Test Ban Treaty Organization initially issued a statement alleging a radioactive plume could hit California by March 18 – they were right.

American health and nuclear officials, and US President Barack Obama himself have repeatedly said there is no real threat of radiation from Japan and any detected radiation would be in the safe zone.

Radioactive fallout from Japan's crippled nuclear plant has reached Southern California but the first readings are far below levels that could pose a health hazard, a diplomat said Friday.

The diplomat, who has access to radiation tracking by the U.N.'s Comprehensive Test Ban Treaty Organization, cited readings from a California-based measuring station of the group.