Senator Robert Byrd Admitted to Hospital for Heat Stroke and Dehydration

Sen. Robert C. Byrd, who holds the record as the longest-serving member of Congress, is seriously ill in a Washington-area hospital.

The West Virginia Democrat's office says the 92-year-old lawmaker has been in the hospital since late last week.

At first he was believed to be suffering from heat exhaustion and severe dehydration. But his office says in a statement doctors have examined Byrd and other medical conditions have developed. His condition is described as serious.

Robert Byrd, the longest-serving senator in U.S. history, is in serious condition in a Washington-area hospital, according to aides to the West Virginia Democrat.

In a statement Sunday, Byrd’s staff said the senator “was admitted to the hospital late last week, suffering from what was believed to be heat exhaustion and severe dehydration as a result of the extreme temperatures. He was expected to remain in the hospital not more than a few days.”

“However, upon further examination by his doctors,” the statement went on, “other conditions have developed which has resulted in his condition being described as ‘serious.’”

Sen. Robert C. Byrd, who holds the record as the longest-serving member of Congress, is seriously ill in a Washington-area hospital, his office said Sunday.

The 92-year-old West Virginia Democrat has been in the hospital since late last week, his office said in a statement. At first Byrd was believed to be suffering from heat exhaustion and severe dehydration, the statement said, but other medical conditions have developed. His condition was described as serious.

The statement did not name the hospital.

The office of Sen. Robert C. Byrd (D-W. Va.), 92, announced Sunday the longest serving senator in history was "seriously ill" and had been admitted to an unnamed Washington-area hospital.

Byrd checked into the hospital with what was believed to be heat exhaustion late last week, and aides believed he would stay just a few days. Instead, more serious issues were discovered.

Byrd has been in and out of the hospital for the past three years, but his office has rarely used the phrase "seriously ill" to describe his health.