Study Published in the Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry Finds Drinking Coffee Lowers Risk of Diabetes

Looking for another reason to justify your daily latte?

A new study suggests that coffee may guard against diabetes.

The study, published in the Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry, shows that coffee improves insulin sensitivity and helps prevent the development of high blood sugar - at least in lab mice.

If you think you're experiencing déjà vu, it could be because numerous studies have linked coffee - both caffeinated and decaf - with reduced risk not only of diabetes, but also of Alzheimer's disease and prostate cancer.

Drinking coffee, a lots of it, may help prevent type 2 diabetes, a disease affecting millions and on the rise across the globe, according to a new study published in the American Chemical Society's Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry.

It's the caffeine, say scientists from Nagoya University in Japan.

The scientists fed either water or coffee to a group of lab mice, a common stand-in for people in such studies. The coffee consumption prevented development of high-blood sugar and improved insulin sensitivity in the mice. That means lower risk of diabetes.

Drinking coffee may do more than get you going in the morning. There’s new evidence that coffee may help guard against diabetes, according to a study in the Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry.

Researchers fed either water or coffee to a group of laboratory mice commonly used to study diabetes.

Here's one more reason to fire up a cup of coffee...

A study in the Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry indicates that coffee may guard against diabetes. The research shows that coffee improves insulin sensitivity and prevents the development of high blood sugar - on lab mice.

If you think you've got déjà vu, it may be because numerous studies have indicated that coffee, both with caffeine and without, can be beneficial not only for those at risk for diabetes, but for those with other troubles including Alzheimers, dementia and prostate cancer.