Coronary Artery Risk Development in Young Adults Study Finds Treating Depression Lowers Weight

A new research has confirmed the link between depression and abdominal obesity, which has been associated with an increased risk for cancer and cardiovascular disease.

You may also want to see
First Anti-NMDA Receptor Encephalitis case reported in India
Birth complications found to be more common at night
Malaria charities use World Cup to highlight disease
Study shows unhealthy Scots live dangerously
Hospitals attached to medical colleges to offer free treatment in Karnataka
“We found that, in a sample of young adults during a 15-year period, those who started out reporting high levels of depression gained weight at a faster rate than others in the study, but starting out overweight did not lead to changes in depression," said assistant professor of Sociology Belinda Needham, from University of Alabama at Birmingham (UAB).

New research provides more evidence of a link between depression and extra pounds around the waist, although it's not exactly clear how they're connected.

The study raises the possibility that depression causes people to put on extra pounds around the belly. The opposite doesn't appear to be the case: researchers found that overweight people aren't more likely to become depressed than their normal-weight peers.

U.S. researchers, noting a link between depression and belly fat, suggest addressing abdominal fat in treating depression.

Study leader Barbara Needham of the University of Alabama at Birmingham said that at the beginning the 15-year study those reporting high levels of depression gained weight at a faster rate than those reporting low depression.

A study by University of Alabama at Birmingham Assistant Professor of Sociology Belinda Needham, Ph.D. published in the June issue of the American Journal of Public Health confirms a link between abdominal obesity and depression.

The study results were:
1) those who started the study reporting higher levels of depression gained weight faster than those reporting no depression,
2) people who began the study overweight showed no changes in levels of depression regardless of weight gain or weight loss.