Boston University defeats Northeastern, 5-2

57TH BEANPOT When things are going well, it's human nature to relax and enjoy it.

When you're a Boston University hockey player, however, the word "relax" cannot be found anywhere in the program's handbook. Any letdown in play, even if the points are coming, is likely to meet with the cold, steely glare of veteran coach Jack Parker, a rebuke from the captains, and a seat on the bench or in the stands.

Every year expectations for the Terriers are high, and they are stra...

It has been referred to as the "Jack Pot" and the "Jack Parker Invitational" because of the number of times the veteran bench boss has led Boston University to the Beanpot championship. Heading into last night's 57th quest for Boston bragging rights against Northeastern, the No. 1-ranked Terriers had 28 Beanpot crowns to their credit.

Well, say hello to No. 29. The third-ranked Huskies, who have been atop the Hockey East standings for the bulk of the season, gave it the...

On college hockey

Boston's top dogs have won this neighborhood all-skate 29 times now, but never like this. Three shorthanded goals, the last two within 30 seconds with the game on the line in the final half-dozen minutes?

"Who would have thunk?" marveled Boston University coach Jack Parker last night, after his top-ranked Terriers had clawed dumbstruck Northeastern, 5-2, for their 12th Beanpot title in 15 years. "I've never seen that in my life in a Beanpot game. It...

David Warsofsky hesitated for just a second. He was at the end of his shift on the Boston University penalty kill when teammate Brandon Yip blocked a shot from Northeastern's Mike Hewkin, and the puck bounced off Yip's shinpads onto the ice just short of the blue line.

Warsofsky saw the loose puck, and he saw open ice. He scooped up the puck and took off.

The fleet freshman defenseman raced down the right wing at nearly top speed, catching teammate Eric Gryba follow...

57TH BEANPOT

It was a most unfamiliar feeling, particularly for a Northeastern goaltender on the first Monday in February. Brad Thiessen was standing in the crease at the Garden surrounded by thousands of empty seats. That wasn't the unfamiliar part - NU routinely plays before sparse crowds on Causeway Street. The novelty was the timing - just before 11 p.m., when the Huskies and their dogged followers usually are back on Huntington Avenue while the Beanpot continues wi...