Barry White Dies

Barry White (September 12, 1944(1944-09-12) – July 4, 2003) was an American record producer and singer-songwriter.

A five-time Grammy Award-winner known for his rich bass voice and romantic image, White's greatest success came in the 1970s as a solo singer and with his Love Unlimited Orchestra, crafting many enduring hit soul funk, and disco songs. Worldwide, White had many gold and platinum albums and singles, with combined sales of over 100 million, according to critics Ed Hogan and Wade Kergan.

White had been ill with chronically high blood pressure for some time, which resulted in kidney failure in the autumn of 2002. He suffered a stroke in May 2003, after which he was forced to retire from public life. On July 4, 2003, he died at Cedars-Sinai Medical Center in Los Angeles after suffering from renal failure. White was cremated, and his ashes were scattered by his family off the California coast.

On September 20 2004, he was posthumously inducted into the Dance Music Hall of Fame at a ceremony held in New York.