President Carter Receives the Nobel Peace Prize

In 2002, President Carter received the Nobel Peace Prize for his work "to find peaceful solutions to international conflicts, to advance democracy and human rights, and to promote economic and social development" through The Carter Center.

Three sitting presidents, Theodore Roosevelt, Woodrow Wilson and Barack Obama, have received the prize; Carter is unique in receiving the award for his actions after leaving the presidency. He is, along with Martin Luther King, Jr., one of only two native Georgians to receive the Nobel.

Former US President Jimmy Carter has been awarded this year's Nobel Peace Prize.
The five-member committee chose Mr Carter for "decades of untiring effort to find peaceful solutions to international conflicts, to advance democracy and human rights, and to promote economic and social development".

Although Mr Carter has not openly criticised President George W Bush's policy on Iraq, Friday's award "should be interpreted as a criticism of the line that the current administration has taken," said Committee chairman Gunnar Berge.

"It's a kick in the leg to all that follow the same line as the United States," Mr Berge said.

In his acceptance statement, Mr Carter said he was "deeply grateful" for the honour.

"This honour serves as an inspiration not only to us, but also to suffering people around the world, and I accept it on their behalf," he said.

The former US president also called for greater efforts to promote peace and justice.

"People everywhere share the same dream of a caring community that prevents war and oppression," he said.

Mediation praised

Announcing the decision, the Nobel Committee said that during his presidency from 1977 to 1981, Mr Carter's "mediation was a vital contribution to the Camp David Accords between Israel and Egypt, in itself a great enough achievement to qualify for the Nobel Peace Prize".

"At a time when the cold war between East and West was still predominant, he placed renewed emphasis on the place of human rights in international politics."

Mr Carter is the third US president to receive the Nobel Peace Prize - after Woodrow Wilson and Theodore Roosevelt.

He will receive the award at a ceremony at Oslo's City Hall on 10 December - the anniversary of the death of the prize's creator, Swedish industrialist - and the inventor of dynamite - Alfred Nobel.

Other candidates

A record 156 candidates were put forward for the prize this year, including Afghan President Hamid Karzai, dissidents and campaigning Irish rock star Bono.

Organisations such as the European Court of Human Rights and the UN war crimes tribunal at The Hague were also in the running.

New York, which was worst hit in the 11 September 2001 terror attacks, was represented by its former mayor Rudolph Giuliani.

The Committee also considered nominations for the Salvation Army, the Tiananmen Mothers, a network of women who lost relatives in the 1989 massacre in Beijing, and the ecumenical patriarch Bartholomew, spiritual leader of Orthodox Christians.

OSLO, Norway — Former President Carter won the Nobel Peace Prize today for his ``untiring effort'' to find peaceful solutions to international conflicts and to advance democracy and human rights.
The Norwegian Nobel Committee contrasted Carter's success in finding peace between Egypt and Israel through diplomacy with President Bush's vow to oust Saddam Hussein, by force if necessary.

``It (the award) should be interpreted as a criticism of the line that the current administration has taken,'' said Gunnar Berge, the Nobel committee chairman. ``It's a kick in the leg to all that follow the same line as the United States.''

Although the committee has often used the prize to send a political message, it rarely makes such a direct comment. Other members of the committee distanced themselves from Berge's statement, calling it his personal view.

``In the committee, we didn't discuss what sort of interpretation of the grounds there should be. It wasn't a topic,'' committee member Hanna Kvanmo was quoted as telling the Norwegian news agency NTB.

The committee cited Carter's ``vital contribution'' to the Camp David Accords between Israel and Egypt and his efforts in conflict resolution on several continents and the promotion of human rights after his presidency.

``In a situation currently marked by threats of the use of power, Carter has stood by the principles that conflicts must as far as possible be resolved through mediation and international co-operation based on international law, respect for human rights, and economic development,'' the citation said, without mentioning Iraq.

The award is worth $1 million.