FDA Approves Forest's Lexapro

Escitalopram (trade names Lexapro, Cipralex, Seroplex) is an antidepressant of the selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor (SSRI) class.

It is approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) for the treatment in adults with major depressive disorder, generalized anxiety disorder, social anxiety disorder, or panic disorder. Escitalopram is the S-stereoisomer (enantiomer) of the earlier Lundbeck drug citalopram, hence the name escitalopram. Escitalopram is noted for its high selectivity of serotonin reuptake inhibition and has side effects typical for the SSRI class.

Escitalopram is an antidepressant (selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor-SSRI) used to treat depression and anxiety. It works by restoring the balance of certain natural substances (neurotransmitters such as serotonin) in the brain. Escitalopram may improve your feelings of well-being and energy level and decrease nervousness.

Lexapro has been commercially available in the US since its original launch in 2002, and has been prescribed to more than 18 million US adults for depression, anxiety or both. Forest licensed Lexapro from the Danish pharmaceutical company, Lundbeck when the drug was in the clinical stage. Lexapro is Forest Laboratories's biggest revenue-maker with total sales of $2.8bn in 2008. The drug is available in 5mg, 10mg and 20mg tablets and also as an oral solution (1mg/ml). Lexapro is also marketed as Cipralex, Seroplex and Seroplexa.

Lexapro is an antidepressant in a group of drugs called selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs). It affects chemicals in the brain that may become unbalanced and cause depression or anxiety.

Lexapro is used to treat anxiety in adults and major depressive disorder in adults and adolescents who are at least 12 years old.