Chris Weinke Wins 2000 Heisman Trophy

Weinke Wins The Heisman Chris Weinke capped a remarkable back-to-school story Saturday night when the 28-year-old Florida State quarterback won the Heisman Trophy in one of the closest votes in the history of the award.

Weinke, who spent six years playing minor league baseball before returning to school in 1997, finished off a record-setting season by leading the Seminoles into an Orange Bowl matchup against No. 1 Oklahoma with a chance for a second straight national championship.

"With apologies to Lou Gehrig, I feel like I'm the luckiest man in the world," Weinke said. "I got to pursue two dreams. The first one, baseball, didn't work out the way I would have liked. But the second one, football, did."

When his name was called, Weinke, wearing a blue suit and silver tie, smiled, stood up and walked to the podium to accept the 25-pound bronze trophy.

Narrow Vote Gives Weinke the Heisman

All the talk about Chris Weinke being too old to win college football's most prestigious award became old news Saturday night when Florida State's senior quarterback won the 66th Heisman Trophy in ceremonies at New York's Downtown Athletic Club.

In the seventh-closest Heisman balloting, Weinke had 369 first-place votes and finished with 1,628 points, 76 more than Oklahoma's senior quarterback, Josh Heupel, who had 286 first-place votes and 1,552 points. Purdue senior quarterback Drew Brees was third with 619 points while Texas Christian senior running back LaDainian Tomlinson was fourth with 566.

Chris Weinke wins Heisman

Chris Weinke capped a remarkable back-to-school story Saturday night when the 28-year-old Florida State quarterback won the Heisman Trophy in one of the closest votes in the history of the award.

Weinke, who spent six years playing minor-league baseball for the Toronto Blue Jays before returning to school in 1997, finished off a record-setting season by leading the Seminoles to an Orange Bowl matchup against No. 1 Oklahoma, with a chance for a second consecutive national championship.

The six-foot-five, 229-pounder from St. Paul, Minn., led the U.S. with a school-record 4,167 yards passing, threw 33 touchdown passes and had only 11 interceptions. He recovered from a serious neck injury late in the '98 season to become the Atlantic Coast Conference's career passing leader with 9,839 yards.

With apologies to Lou Gehrig, I feel like I'm the luckiest man in the world. I got to pursue two dreams. The first one, baseball, didn't work out the way I would have liked. But the second one, football, did.”

— Chris Weinke