FDA Approves Novartis's Femara

This medication is used to treat certain types of breast cancer (such as hormone-receptor-positive breast cancer) in women after menopause.

Letrozole is also used to help prevent the cancer from returning. Some breast cancers are made to grow faster by a natural hormone called estrogen. Letrozole decreases the amount of estrogen the body makes and helps to slow or reverse the growth of these breast cancers.
Letrozole is usually not used in women of childbearing age

Femara has been approved for the first-line treatment of postmenopausal women with hormone receptor positive or hormone receptor unknown locally advanced or metastatic breast cancer. The drug is a once-a-day oral treatment originally approved in 1997 for advanced breast cancer in postmenopausal women with disease progression following antiestrogen therapy.
Estrogen has been shown to stimulate the growth of certain hormone-dependent cancer cells. In postmenopausal women, estrogen is primarily produced from the conversion of adrenal androgens to estrogen. This conversion is catalyzed by an enzyme known as aromatase. Femara contains 2.5 mg of letrozole, a compound that blocks the action of aromatase and therefore inhibits the conversion of androgens to estrogens.

Femara lowers estrogen levels in postmenopausal women, which may slow the growth of certain types of breast tumors that need estrogen to grow in the body.

Femara is used to treat breast cancer in postmenopausal women. It is often given to women who have been taking tamoxifen (Nolvadex, Soltamox) for 5 years.

This medication is used to treat certain types of breast cancer (such as hormone-receptor-positive breast cancer) in women after menopause. Letrozole is also used to help prevent the cancer from returning. Some breast cancers are made to grow faster by a natural hormone called estrogen. Letrozole decreases the amount of estrogen the body makes and helps to slow or reverse the growth of these breast cancers.