Nissan 300C is First Produced

The Nissan 300C was the name applied to the export version of the Nissan Cedric Y30 series, a luxury car made by the Japanese manufacturer Nissan.

It was produced between 1984 and 1987 and available as a saloon and an estate.

Arriving in the European market at the same time as the larger estate model, the saloon was meant to target the German luxury executive cars that dominated the class in the 80s (Mercedes S-Class, BMW 7-series). Trimmed in moquette cloth, the car featured adjustable front seats, adjustable steering wheel, power steering, air conditioning, tinted windows, a LW/MW/FM stereo/cassette player, and a 3.0L V6. The saloon featured the same independent front suspension as the estate, but had a five-link suspension system for ride quality. A five-speed manual gearbox and a 3.0L V6 engine gave the saloon a max speed of 120 mph (190 km/h), with 0-60 mph being achieved in about 8.4 seconds.

The wagon's primary difference was a four-speed automatic gearbox, with similar power characteristics to the manual gearbox but with a slower top speed of 116 mph (187 km/h).

The VG series engine was Nissan's first mass-produced V6. It found its way into dozens of different Nissan vehicles, of which the 300C was among the first models. The VG design was used alongside the VQ series engine starting in 1994, and in 2004 the VG was retired, and the VQ was used solely.

The Y30 was sold from 1984 through 1987. It used the 3.0 L (2960 cc) VG30E V6 for the 300C private cars. The diesel engine was used for taxi in Japan, Singapore, and Hong Kong.

The front suspension was upgraded from double wishbone to MacPherson strut, with optional sonic modified suspension.

This generation saw the introduction of the VG series V6, which was inspired by an Alfa Romeo design.

The sedan was meant to target the German luxury executive cars that dominated the class in the 80s (Mercedes S-Class, BMW 7-series). Trimmed in moquette cloth, the car featured adjustable front seats, adjustable steering wheel, power steering, air conditioning, tinted windows, a LW/MW/FM stereo/cassette player, and the V30 3.0L V6. The sedan featured the same independent front suspension as the wagon, but had a five-link suspension system for ride quality. A five-speed manual gearbox and the V6 engine gave the sedan a max speed of 120 mph (190 km/h), with 0-60 mph being achied in about 8.4 seconds.
On the 4-door hardtop, the front driver and passenger seat belt shoulder strap was connected at the top to the ceiling, however, the upper portion could be detached, with the shoulder strap resting on the driver's and passenger's shoulder so that rear passengers could have an unobstructed view from the rear seat without the seat belt hanging from the ceiling. The upper part would then swing up to the ceiling and could be fastened into place.

Trim levels added the Brougham VIP to the top of the list, including Turbo Brougham VIP and the Turbo Brougham, released June 1984.

A high mounted center brake lamp was added March 1994, as well as CFC free air conditioning.

1987 was the last year of the wagon/van, with the successor being the Nissan Bluebird wagon.