"Burnt Weeny Sandwich" by Frank Zappa and the Mothers of Invention Is Released

Burnt Weeny Sandwich is an album by Frank Zappa and the Mothers of Invention, released in 1970 (see 1970 in music). The album was essentially a 'posthumous' Mothers release having been released after Frank Zappa dissolved the band.

Presumably a favorite musician of Zappa's, the versatile Ian Underwood's contributions are significant on this album. The album, like its counterpart Weasels Ripped My Flesh, comprises tracks from the Mothers vault that were not previously released. Whereas Weasels mostly showcases the Mothers in a live setting, much of Burnt Weeny Sandwich features studio work and structured Zappa compositions, like the centerpiece of the album, "The Little House I Used To Live In," which consists of several movements and employs compound meters such as 11/8 with an overlaid melody in 10/8.

The album's rather unusual title, Zappa would later say in an interview, comes from an actual snack that he enjoyed eating, consisting of a burnt Hebrew National hot dog sandwiched between two pieces of bread with mustard.

Burnt Weeny Sandwich and Weasels Ripped My Flesh were also reissued together on vinyl as 2 Originals of the Mothers of Invention, with the original covers used as the left and right sides of the inner spread, and the front cover depicting a pistol shooting toothpaste onto a toothbrush.

"Igor's Boogie" is a reference to a major Zappa influence, composer Igor Stravinsky.