'Intruder In The Dust' Is Published

The novel focuses on Lucas Beauchamp, a black farmer accused of murdering a white man.

He is exonerated through the efforts of black and white teenagers and a spinster from a long-established Southern family. It was written as Faulkner's response as a Southern writer to the racial problems facing the South. In his Selected Letters, Faulkner wrote: "the premise being that the white people in the south, before the North or the Govt. or anybody else owe and must pay a responsibility to the negro."

Intruder in the Dust presaged Faulkner's speaking out on integration. He argued in several public letters that southernblacks must receive equal rights, which led to harassment andthreats by bigoted neighbors. However, his resistance to federal intervention to enforce those rights alienated staunch liberals. Faulkner's moderate liberalism angered everyone.