The First Mother's Day

President Woodrow Wilson issued a proclamation on May 9, 1914, asking Americans to give a public expression of reverence to mothers through the celebration of Mother's Day.

Carnations have come to represent the day as they were distributed at one of the first commemorations honoring the mother of the founder of Mother’s Day.

Anna Jarvis, a Grafton, West Virginia native, is credited with conceiving and launching the campaign that resulted in the creation of a national day honoring mothers in the United States. Legislative actions and annual Congressional proclamations documented in the Congressional Record praise her tireless efforts to create a lasting commemoration to her mother, Anna Reeves Jarvis, as well as to all mothers, living and deceased.

The modern Mother's Day holiday was created by Anna Jarvis in Grafton, West Virginia, as a day to honor mothers and motherhood; especially within the context of families, and family relationships.[1] It is now celebrated on various days, in many parts of the world. Father's Day is a corresponding holiday honoring fathers.

The holiday eventually became so commercialized that many, including its founder, Anna Jarvis, consider it a "Hallmark Holiday", i.e. one with an overwhelming commercial purpose.

The moon never beams without bringing me dreams
Of that wonderful mother of mine;
The birds never sing but a message they bring
Of that wonderful mother of mine. ”

— Walter Goodwin, music, and Clyde Hager, lyrics, "That Wonderful Mother of Mine."