'Call of the Wild' is Published

Buck the dog starts out in life as the handsome and well-loved pet of Judge Miller in Jack London's 1903 novel The Call of the Wild.

His peaceful and easy existence ends suddenly one day when a groundskeeper on Judge Miller's farm kidnaps Buck. What Buck cannot know is that with gold just discovered in Alaska, dogs like himself are a hot commodity. The greedy groundskeeper sells Buck to a sled dog trainer, who ships the kidnapped pet to the harsh land of the Alaskan Yukon territory. Buck must now learn to live by the rules of this bleak place, where dogs are not treated with kindness or compassion. An unusual tale for its "dog's eye" perspective on an important moment in American history, The Call of the Wild is a spirited tale of adventure, experience, and loss. The days of the Alaskan Gold Rush come alive in a whole new way through Buck's eyes. His moving tale is one that no reader should miss.

The Call of the Wild is a novel by American writer Jack London. The plot concerns a previously domesticated dog named Buck, whose primordial instincts return after a series of events leads to his serving as a sled dog in the Yukon during the 19th-century Klondike Gold Rush, in which sled dogs were bought at generous prices.

Published in 1903, The Call of the Wild is London's most-read book, and it is generally considered his best, the masterpiece of his so-called "early period". Because the protagonist is a dog, it is sometimes classified as a juvenile novel, suitable for children, but it is dark in tone and contains numerous scenes of cruelty and violence.

The Call of the Wild is a novel by American writer Jack London. The plot concerns a previously domesticated dog named Buck, whose primordial instincts return after a series of events leads to his serving as a sled dog in the Yukon during the 19th-century Klondike Gold Rush, in which sled dogs were bought at generous prices.

Published in 1903, The Call of the Wild is London's most-read book, and it is generally considered his best, the masterpiece of his so-called "early period". Because the protagonist is a dog, it is sometimes classified as a juvenile novel, suitable for children, but it is dark in tone and contains numerous scenes of cruelty and violence.