Connecticut Ratifies the US Constitution and is the 5th State Admitted to the Union

In the Name of the People of the State of Connecticut.

We the Delegates of the People of sd State in general Convention assembled, pursuant to an Act of the Legislature in October last, Have assented to and ratified, and by these presents do assent to, ratify and adopt the Constitution, reported by the Convention of Delegates in Philadelphia, on the 17th day of September AD. 1787. for the United States of America.

Done in Convention this 8th day of January AD. 1788. In witness whereof we have hereunto set our hands.

MATTHEW GRISWOLD President:
JEREH WADSWORTH
JESSE ROOT
ISAAC LEE
SELAH HEART
ZEBULON PECK jur
ELISHA PITKIN
ERASTUS WOLCOTT
JOHN WATSON
JOHN TREADWELL
WILLIAM JUDD
JOSEPH MOSELY
WAIT GOODRICH
JOHN CURTISS
ASA BARNS
STEPHEN MIX MITCHELL
JOHN CHESTER
OLIV ELLSWORTH
ROGER NEWBERRY
ROGER SHERMAN
PIERPONT EDWARDS
SAMUEL BEACH
DANIEL HOLBROOK
JOHN HOLBROOK
GIDEON BUCKINGHAM
LEWIS MALLET Jr
JOSEPH HOPKINS
JOHN WALTON
RICHD LAW
AMASA LEARNED
NATHAN DAUCHY
JAMES DAVENPORT
JOHN DAVENPORT Junr
WM SAML JOHNSON
ELISHA MILLS
ELEPHT DYER
JEDA ELDERKIN
SIMEON SMITH
HENDRICK DOW
SETH PAINE
ASA WITTER
MOSES CLEAVELAND
SAMPSON HOWE
WILLM DANIELSON
WM WILLIAMS
JAMES BRADFORD
JOSHUA DUNLOP
DANIEL LEARNED
MOSES CAMPBELL
BENJAMIN DOW
OLIVER WOLCOTT
JEDEDIAH STRONG
MOSES HAWLEY
CHARLES BURRALL
NATHAN HALE
DANIEL MILES
ASAPH HALL
ISAAC BURNHAM
JOHN WILDER
MARK PRINDLE
JEDIDIAH HUBBELL
AARON AUSTIN
SAMUEL CANFIELD
DANIEL EVERITT
HEZ: FITCH
SAML HUNTINGTON
JED HUNTINGTON
ISAAC HUNTINGTON
ROBERT ROBBINS,
DANTE FOOT
ELI HYDE
JOSEPH WOODBRIDGE
STEPHEN BILLINGS
ANDREW LEE
WILLIAM NOYES
JOSHUA RAYMOND Junr
JERH HALSEY
WHEELER COIT
CHARLES PHELPS
NATHANIEL MINOR
JONATHAN STURGES
THADDEUS BURR
ELISHA WHITTELSEY
JOSEPH MOSS WHITE
AMOS MEAD
JABEZ FITCH
NEHEMIAH BEARDSLEY
JAMES POTTER
JOHN CHANDLER
JOHN BEACH
HEZH ROGERS
LEML SANFORD
WILLIAM HERON
PHILIP BURR BRADLEY
JOSHUA PORTER
BENJN HINMAN
EPAPHRAS SHELDON
ELEAZER CURTISS
JOHN WHITTLESEY
DANL NATHL BRINSMADE
THOMAS FENN
DAVID SMITH
ROBERT McCANE
DANIEL SHERMAN
SAMUEL ORTON
ASHER MILLER
SAML H. PARSONS
EBENR WHITE
HEZH GOODRICH
DYAR THROOK
JABEZ CHAPMAN
CORNELIUS HIGGINS
HEZEKIAH BRAINERD
THEOPHILUS MORGAN
HEZH LANE
WILLIAM HART
SAML SHIPMAN
JEREMIAH WEST
SAMUEL CHAPMAN
ICHABOD WARNER
SAMUEL CARVER
JEREMIAH RIPLEY
EPHRAIM ROOT
JOHN PHELPS
ISAAC FOOT
ABIJAH SESSIONS
CALEB HOLT
SETH CROCKER

State of Connecticut, ss. Hartford January ninth, Anno Domini one thousand, seven hundred and eighty eight. The foregoing Ratification was agreed to, and signed as above, by one hundred and twenty eight, and dissented to by forty Delegates in Convention, which is a Majority of eighty eight.

Certified by MATTHEW GRISWOLD President.

Teste JEDIDIAH STRONG Secretary

On January 9, 1788, Connecticut ratified the Constitution, becoming the fifth state in the Union.

Connecticut suffered under the Articles of Confederation. While paying heavy import duties to New York State, Connecticut found it difficult to discharge its war debts and rebuild its economy. Delegates Oliver Ellsworth, William Samuel Johnson, and Roger Sherman were sent to the Constitutional Convention in Philadelphia with a directive to create a more workable government in accordance with republican principles. As the debate polarized between large and small states over the issue of legislative representation, these men proved invaluable.

Large states advocated representation based on population, while smaller states, such as New Jersey, urged that each state have a single vote. Although protective of Connecticut's interests as a small state, the Connecticut delegation remained flexible and lobbied for the "Connecticut Compromise." It created the current legislative framework of an upper house based on equal representation, the Senate, and a lower house based on proportional representation, the House of Representatives.

Its first constitution, the "Fundamental Orders," was adopted on January 14, 1639, while its current constitution, the third for Connecticut, was adopted in 1965. Connecticut is the fifth of the original thirteen states. The original constitutions influenced the US Constitution as one of the leading authors was Roger Sherman of New Haven.

The western boundaries of Connecticut have been subject to change over time. According to the Hartford Treaty with the Dutch, signed on September 19, 1650, but never ratified by the British, the western boundary of Connecticut ran north from Greenwich Bay for a distance of 20 Miles "provided the said line come not within 10 miles (16 km) [16 km] of Hudson River. This agreement was observed by both sides until war erupted between England and The Netherlands in 1652. No other limits were found. Conflict over uncertain colonial limits continued until the Duke of York captured New Netherland in 1664. "... On the other hand, Connecticut's original Charter in 1662 granted it all the land to the "South Sea," i.e. the Pacific Ocean. Most colonial royal grants were for long east-west strips. Connecticut took its grant seriously, and established a ninth county between the Susquehanna and Delaware Rivers, named Westmoreland County. This resulted in the brief Pennamite Wars with Pennsylvania.

Connecticut's lands also extended across northern Ohio, called the Western Reserve lands. The Western Reserve section was settled largely by people from Connecticut, and they brought Connecticut place names to Ohio. Agreements with Pennsylvania and New York extinguished the land claims by Connecticut within its neighbors, and the Western Reserve lands were relinquished to the federal government, which brought the state to its present boundaries.

Our being tributaries to our sister states is in consequence of the want of a federal system. The state of New York raises 60 or £80,000 a year by impost. Connecticut consumes about one third of the goods upon which this impost is laid, and consequently pays one third of this sum to New York. If we import by the medium of Massachusetts, she has an impost, and to her we pay a tribute. If this is done when we have the shadow of a national government, what shall we not suffer when even that shadow is gone!”

— Oliver Ellsworth