Johannes Vermeer Paints The Wine Glass

The Wine Glass (Dutch: Het glas wijn, also known as The Glass of Wine or Lady and Gentleman Drinking Wine) is a painting by the Dutch artist Johannes Vermeer that portrays a seated woman and a standing man drinking in an interior setting.

The work is, in many aspects, typical of the genre painting of the Delft School developed by Pieter de Hooch in the late 1650s. It contains figures situated in a brightly lit and spacious interior, while its architectural space is highly defined. In addition, the work's figures are set in the middle ground, rather than positioned in the foreground.

Vermeer was about twenty-seven when he painted The Glass of Wine, and according to the critic Walter Liedtke "No analysis of artistic conventions can suggest the sheer beauty and extraordinary refinement of a painting like The Glass of Wine, which may be considered one of Vermeer's first fully mature works"

No analysis of artistic conventions can suggest the sheer beauty and extraordinary refinement of a painting like The Glass of Wine, which may be considered one of Vermeer's first fully mature works. Despite the parallel with De Hooch's designs and less obvious similarities with pictures by other artists, especially Gerard ter Borch, this canvas and the Vermeer's of about 1659-60 cited above no longer convey the impression (as does, for example, Cavalier and Young Woman of about 1657) of depending upon two or three principal sources. Here the artist has clearly mastered a visual language, which despite slips in syntax (as in the recession of floor tiles on the right) is employed with remarkable facility and grace. Vermeer was about twenty-seven years old when he painted this picture, and had reason to feel that his work had begun to rival that of Ter Borch or Frans van Mieris in quality and, at least in his own city, recognition.