Pierre de Tarentaise (Innocent V) elected Pope

Pope Blessed Innocent V (c. 1225 – June 22, 1276), born Pierre de Tarentaise, was Pope from January 21 to June 22, 1276.

He was born around 1225 near Moûtiers in the Tarentaise region of the County of Savoy, then part of the Kingdom of Arles in the Holy Roman Empire, but now in southeastern France. In early life, he joined the Dominican Order, in which he acquired great fame as a preacher. He was the first member of that order to become pope. The only noteworthy feature of his brief and uneventful pontificate was the practical form assumed by his desire for reunion with the Eastern Church. He was proceeding to send legates to Michael VIII Palaeologus (1261-1282), the Eastern Roman Emperor, in connection with the recent decisions of the Second Council of Lyons, when he died at Rome. It is questionable whether anything would have come from this dialogue, largely because of the influence wielded on the pope by Charles of Anjou. By dictating the language used in Innocent's correspondence with Michael, Charles was able to insert terms and styles that would have seemed offensive to the emperor.
Pope Innocent V was the author of several works in philosophy, theology, and canon law, including commentaries on the Pauline epistles and on the Sentences of Peter Lombard, and is sometimes referred to as famosissimus doctor.

Born in Tarentaise, towards 1225; elected at Arezzo, 21 January, 1276; died at Rome, 22 June, 1276. Tarentaise on the upper Isère in south-eastern France was certainly his native province, and the town of Champagny was in all probability his birthplace. At the age of sixteen he joined the Dominican Order. After completing his education, at the University of Paris, where he graduated as master in sacred theology in 1259, he won distinction as a professor in that institution, and is known as "the most famous doctor", "Doctor famosissimus" For some time provincial of his order in France, he became Archbishop of Lyons in 1272 and Cardinal-Bishop of Ostia in 1273. He played a prominent part at the Second Ecumenical Council of Lyons (1274), in which he delivered two discourses to the assembled fathers and also pronounced the funeral oration on St. Bonaventure. Elected as successor to Gregory X, whose intimate adviser he was, he assumed the name of Innocent V and was the first Dominican pope. His policy was peaceable. He sought to reconcile Guelphs and Ghibellines in Italy, restored peace between Pisa and Lucca, and mediated between Rudolph of Hapsburg and Charles of Anjou. He likewise endeavoured to consolidate the union of the Greeks with Rome concluded at the Council of Lyons. He is the author of several works dealing with philosophy, theology and canon law, some of which are still unpublished. The principal among them is his "Commentary on the Sentences of Peter Lombard" (Toulouse, 1652). Four philosophical treatises: "De unitate formæ", "De materia caelig;li", "De æternitate mundi", "De intellectu et voluntate", are also due to his pen. A commentary on the Pauline Epistles frequently published under the name of Nicholas of Gorran (Cologne, 1478) is claimed for him by some critics.

Innocent V, born Pierre de Champagni or de Tarentaise, Roman Catholic Pope from the 21st of January to the 22nd of June 1276, was born about 1225 in Savoy and entered the Dominican order at an early age. He studied theology under St. Thomas Aquinas, Albertus Magnus and Bonaventura, and in 1262 was elected provincial of his order in France. He was made Archbishop of Lyons in 1271; cardinal-bishop of Ostia and Velletri, and grand penitentiary in 1275; and, partly through the influence of Charles of Anjou, was elected to succeed Pope Gregory X. As pope he established peace between the republics of Lucca and Pisa, and confirmed Charles of Anjou in his office of imperial vicar of Tuscany. He was seeking to carry out the Lyons agreement with the Eastern Church when he died. His successor was Adrian V. Innocent V, before he became pope, prepared, in conjunction with Albertus Magnus and Thomas Aquinas, a rule of studies for his order, which was accepted in June 1259. He was the author of several works in philosophy, theology and canon law, including commentaries on the Scriptures and on the Sentences of Peter Lombard, and is sometimes referred to as famosissimus doctor. He preached the funeral sermon at Lyons over St. Bonaventura. His bulls are in the Turin collection (1859).