1975 Final Four U of L - UCLA and Wooden. Program cover showing previous year, with David Thompson and NC St. soaring over Bill Walton, and stopping the Bruin's run of titles.
1975 Final Four U of L - UCLA and Wooden. Program cover showing previous year, with David Thompson and NC St. soaring over Bill Walton, and stopping the Bruin's run of titles.
Hell in the Hall - Source
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UCLA Beats Louisville in Final Four

The 1975 NCAA Men's Division I Basketball Tournament involved 32 schools playing in single-elimination play to determine the national champion of men's NCAA Division I college basketball. It began on March 15, 1975, and ended with the championship game on March 31 in San Diego, California. A total of 36 games were played, including a third place game in each region and a national third place game.
UCLA, coached by John Wooden, won his 10th and last national title with a 92–85 victory in the final game over Kentucky, coached by Joe B. Hall. Richard Washington of UCLA was named the tournament's Most Outstanding Player.
The Bruins again had an advantage by playing the Final Four in their home state. It marked the last time a team won the national championship playing in its home state.

John Wooden finally called it a career in 1975, but not before taking one last NCAA title into retirement with him.

The timing of his announcement was exquisite, coming immediately after UCLA's 75–74 overtime win against Louisville in the NCAA semifinal at San Diego. That was March 29. Two nights later, the Bruins won one more championship for the Wizard—beating Kentucky, 92–85, as Richard Washington and David Meyers combined for 52 points.

The University of California, Los Angeles won the national collegiate basketball championship tonight for the 10th and last time under the direction of Coach John Wooden.

The Bruins, proving speed more valuable than muscle, raced up and down the court from start to finish to beat a powerful University of Kentucky team 92-85, in Wooden's final game before retirement.

When it was done, the crowd of 15,153 at the San Diego Arena remained to give Wooden, the Wizard of Westwood, a standing ovation for about four minutes.