With a top speed of nine and a half miles per hour the San Francisco cable cars have been "climbing halfway to the stars" since 1873. Poet and author Maya Angelou was the first black cable car conductor in San Francisco.
With a top speed of nine and a half miles per hour the San Francisco cable cars have been "climbing halfway to the stars" since 1873. Poet and author Maya Angelou was the first black cable car conductor in San Francisco.
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Maya Angelou becomes first black female streetcar conductor

Angelou credits a teacher and friend of Angelou's family, a Mrs. Bertha Flowers, with helping her speak again. Flowers introduced her to authors such as Dickens, Shakespeare, Poe, Douglas Johnson, and James Weldon Johnson, as well as black female artists like Frances Harper, Anne Spencer, and Jessie Fauset.[16] When Angelou was 13, she and her brother returned to live with her mother in San Francisco. During World War II, she attended George Washington High School and studied dance and drama on a scholarship at the California Labor School. Before graduating, she worked as the first black female streetcar conductor in San Francisco.

Maya began to speak again at 13, when she and her brother rejoined their mother in San Francisco. Maya attended Mission High School and won a scholarship to study dance and drama at San Francisco's Labor School, where she was exposed to the progressive ideals that animated her later political activism. She dropped out of school in her teens to become San Francisco's first African American female cable car conductor.

Maya Angelou is one of the most important African American authors and orators of the twentieth century. Her achievements span over seven decades and showcase a wealth of talents, beginning in the early 1940s when she became San Francisco’s first female cable car conductor.