Iowa is voted into the Union on March 3, 1845, but doesn't become official until December 28, 1846 when President Polk signs Iowa's admission bill into law
Iowa is voted into the Union on March 3, 1845, but doesn't become official until December 28, 1846 when President Polk signs Iowa's admission bill into law
Library of Congress - Source
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Iowa is the 29th State Admitted to the Union

The first American settlers officially moved to Iowa in June 1833. Primarily, they were families from Ohio, Pennsylvania, New York, Indiana, Kentucky, and Virginia. On July 4, 1838, the U.S. Congress established the Territory of Iowa. President Martin Van Buren appointed Robert Lucas governor of the territory, which at the time had 22 counties and a population of 23,242.

Almost immediately after achieving territorial status, a clamor arose for statehood. On December 28, 1846, Iowa became the 29th state in the Union when President James K. Polk signed Iowa's admission bill into law. Once admitted to the Union, the state's boundary issues resolved, and most of its land purchased from the Indians. Iowa set its direction to development and organized campaigns for settlers and investors, boasting the young frontier state's rich farmlands, fine citizens, free and open society, and good government.